Registrations in the European car market rose by 6.8% in the year to date to reach 13,937,399 units, according to statistics provider JATO Dynamics.

The company reported that the rise in registrations in 29 European countries in the year to November 2016 represented the largest increase since 2007, with the seasonally-adjusted annual rate (SAAR) reaching 15,097,119 units.

In November, registrations increased 5% from the same month in 2015 to 1,184,140, as all but three of the 29 European markets experienced a year-on-year rise.

The Spanish market saw growth of 13%, while sales plummeted 20.7% in the Netherlands, making it the worst performing car market in Europe.

Though Volkswagen Group’s market share dipped slightly by 0.28%, it retained its position with almost a quarter of registrations, accounting for 24.56% in November.

PSA Group saw the largest decline in market share, slipping 0.83% while still retaining its position as Europe’s third largest car group.

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By GlobalData

The SUV segment performed in line with seasonal expectations, with 316,278 units registered, up 16.1% on November 2015’s figure, and seizing a 26.7% market share.

Felipe Munoz, global automotive analyst at JATO Dynamics, warned that despite the strong results this year, the expected activation of Article 50 in 2017 may have implications for the European car market.

Munoz said: “2017 will bring further uncertainty – with the UK expected to trigger Article 50 in March, beginning the process of exiting the EU.

“Any decline in consumer confidence in the UK is likely to impact the European automotive market greatly – especially given that the German car market counts the UK as its biggest export market.”